Today’s Wall Street Journal, October 17, 2016, features an article on Samsung’s woes with exploding batteries inside their Note7 cell phone. WSJ also reports that the Note7 has been banned from US flights. Glad you don’t have an Note7? If your a nurse, doctor, technician or someone who uses a mobile computing cart in your hospital, your worries may not be over.

Samsung admits to self-testing batteries.
Numerous incidents have occurred in hospital facilities regarding unsafe batteries on mobile computing carts. Why is this so? Most cart companies don’t make their batteries, they buy them from a common source. Those who do make batteries, in particular the kind that can swap, keep costs down by using inexpensive materials.

Why Scott-Clark FMCPT batteries are safe:
Our patent pending FMCPT batteries are Made in the USA by our partner Ultralife Corporation. We chose to use a more expensive, larger, and significantly safer battery material in our product. FMCPT batteries have both Underwriters Laboratory’s UL2054 and International Electrotechnical Commission’s IEC62133 certifications.

Every FMCPT battery is inspected at the end of the production line, tested for voltage requirements, and checked for any problems before it’s “put to sleep” and boxed. This extra measure may seem excessive, but when it comes to the safety of our customers we like to use extra care.

If your current carts have some other type of swappable battery, or have no battery at all, don’t fret. FMCPT batteries can easily retrofit to any mobile computing cart. They are also available on many new carts in the United States and several countries worldwide.

Call or e-mail us for more information.
When it comes to powering mobile computing carts in your hospital facility, safety is our number one concern. We also consider long run times, long battery life, and ease of use to be extremely important. There is no better choice on the market today that the patent pending FMCPT power system.

Bruce G. Bennett: 610.757.8801 or bbennett@scott-clark.com