Hospital carts were designed to help doctors and nurses complete their long hospital ward rounds. Properly functioning medical carts on wheels are essential to assuring the health and safety of patients in any medical facility. In recent years, advances in technology have led to the production of medical computer carts on wheels, which have been adopted in many healthcare facilities. These medical computer carts have revolutionized caregiving by allowing nurses and doctors to access patients’ medical records at their bedside. However, as technology continues to advance at a rapid pace, it may be time for many healthcare facilities to replace or repair outdated medical carts.

When to Purchase a New Hospital Cart

Well-designed medical computer carts make nurses and doctors’ jobs easier by facilitating the delivery of medical services. However, some medical workstations on wheels are outdated, or not well designed, and can actually make medical professionals’ jobs harder. These inconvenient hospital carts should be replaced with newer, state-of-the-art equipment.

Problems Associated with Out-of-Date Hospital Carts

The nursing profession has some of the highest rates of work-related musculoskeletal injuries. The large and cumbersome designs of some medical computer carts make them difficult to push from room to room. This issue could contribute to nurses’ musculoskeletal injuries. Other problems associated with outdated medical computer carts include poor battery life and no visible indication of battery-charge status. This can lead to longer wait times as nurses charge carts that have lost power. Additionally, small computer screens on some medical computer carts can make logging data difficult.

New, High-performance Medical Carts

Fortunately, new and innovative mobile carts have been developed to resolve all these common issues. These carts are lighter weight, and thus easier to move. They are also easier to manage as they include long-life batteries with bright status lights. These new medical computer carts can also be configured for their specific tasks, from registration to medication storage, to vital sign capture. They can also include multiple drawers to improve organization. medical computer carts Some new medical carts can even be customized to meet the specific demands of the healthcare setting. For example, carts can be equipped with cameras and small wristband printers for patient documentation and registration. Additionally, extra displays, probes, and power packs can be added to meet particular needs.

When to Repair an Existing Cart

When upgrading medical equipment, buying brand new medical computer carts is not the only solution. In some cases, medical carts may be ergonomic and easy to use, but lack up-to-date technology, or just have specific defects. In these cases, repairing, modifying, and retrofitting used medical carts can be a cost-effective alternative for upgrading equipment. Used medical carts can be upgraded in the hospital or medical facility to minimize any possible negative impact on work efficiency. Trained technicians can add casters, drawers, battery packs, technical equipment, and any other necessary modifications.

Battery Replacement

Battery Replacement The battery life of medical computer carts can be a major issue for nurses and doctors. Poor battery life can lead to healthcare professionals spending more time charging carts, and less time caring for patients. To solve this problem, used medical carts can be retrofitted with Flexible Mobile Cart Power Technology (FMCPT). In carts with FMCPT, batteries can be changed out or charged directly on the cart. This enables staff to focus on patient care and forget about charging carts.

Final Thoughts

Technological advancements have revolutionized hospital carts. Having updated medical computer carts with the latest technology can make doctors and nurses jobs easier. These changes can ultimately improve the efficiency and the quality of patient care. Medical computer carts that are difficult to move, or inconvenient to use should be replaced with lighter, state-of-the-art equipment. Ergonomic medical carts that lack the latest technology can be refurbished to improve functionality for a fraction of the cost.
Emma Reed has a background in Psychology (B.A.) and Medical Anthropology (M.S.) and writes for a variety of medical publications. Her passion is making cutting-edge medical information accessible to a wider audience, and her work often examines the intersections of sociology, anthropology, and medicine.
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